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Get the resources, information, and answers to your burning questions about how to be a digital nomad. From quitting your day job to finding freelance gigs to taking your business on the road.
#255
There’s a common misconception that in order to become a Digital Nomad you need to quit your current gig and have a side hustle that’s already making you enough money to live on. Sure that’s a great path to take - though it’s not always feasibly for everyone, especially those with busy family and social lives - it’s by far not the only one.

Many people actually already have the tools at their disposal to live the life of a Digital Nomad without a career (or job) change.

Digital Nomads come in all types, with some working a classic gig where they need to sign in to a remote-working dashboard for 8 hours a day. Some have a full client-roster of freelance clients that they can easily still manage overseas after a quick email explaining those 2am emails. Some Digital Nomads have even talked their way into remote work arrangements with their current employers.

Did you quit your full-time job to jump into living the nomad life?

Share your story!
#266
I will do exactly this at the End of the year. I work at the Local Stock Exchange in My country. I have a very good job, but I hate it. I want to do my own thing and become a Digital Nomad. This has been a dream for me for a few years now and I have decided that I do not want to sit in my current job for another 10 years. I am almost 32 years old now, but fortunately, I do not have any dependents. I would like to slow travel and work in Co-Working Spaces and build up some Businesses. Create Mastermind groups and work my way up.

This is extremely risky and scary as I will throw away my degree and career at the same time, but I choose to be happy and not stay in this crazy fast high pressure environment.

Wish me luck :)
#272
To share my story and opinion regarding this topic:

Do you have to quit your full time job to become a digital nomad? Maybe. Should you if needed? Yes!

Some people will work for people where their physical presence is required (these are the people who should quit). But some people will have jobs that they can turn into remote jobs if they don't already. Tim Ferris in his famous book "4 hour work week" shares great examples of how people can tactically convince their existing bosses to eventually let them work remotely. If you're thinking of taking the plunge and have not read his book, DO IT!

Personally I quit my full time job, and figured out my own ways to make money instead of working for someone else. I'm currently 24, with no ties except friends and family back home. It was hard to leave them but it won't be the last time I see them. I realize a lot of people have a lot more commitments and challenges than me to becoming a digital nomad, but they are exactly that, "challenges". If you want something and you're the type of person who makes things happen, you see your obstacles as challenges and you figure out how to overcome them. Developing this mindset is absolutely essential to becoming a digital nomad if you have a lot holding you back.

There's no such thing as a problem, only challenges exist. Practice this, believe it, and solve your challenges!
#377
I did have a full time job but you are then limited to vacation days for travel! Not enough to be a true nomad! Now I do several PT jobs that only require a great internet connection! Sometimes that is tough, but it limits the days you have to report to the office that you are "out of office"!
#398
Hi Fellows,

I had a full time job, but I was a project manager and scrum master and I didn't see it realistic to do those jobs on the road so I ended up setting up my own company. I'm a starting web developer - and DN - now and trying to turn my location independence and flexibility regarding work places and work times into an asset - in clients eyes - instead of limitation. I'm from Finland and remote working is not yet very common thing there, but the modern IT-companies are starting to understand its benefits. If you're really good in what you're doing it could be possible to make some kind of remote working arrangement with your employer.
#462
I've done both — ran my own Sole Proprietorship (10 years) and Full-time employment, remotely (6 years). If your current job allows you to work remotely, then you probably don't need to quit. If it won't and you want to become a nomad, then you'll need to find another job. I met my wife while living & working full time in LA. She lived in England. I moved there, and that's what set me on my current course.

I created my business out of necessity; in England I wasn't allowed to work for a British organization until I was a resident. But I needed to make money. I setup an American Sole Proprietorship and began 'freelancing' (design)—then it was just an American or Brit contracting an American company. I did that for 7 years, then we moved to Colorado and I took a full-time remote job, which is what I do now.

Nowadays there are so many jobs available – both employed or self-employed – which allow people to work remotely.
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